PhotoIreland

Dublin, Ireland | July 2016

Flâneur Activities

July 01 2016

Flâneur Press Conference

At Generator, Cinema Room, on July 1st at 11 am the press conference by Nuno Ricou Salgado to present the project Flâneur -New Urban Narratives. 

...

Discover more

Flâneur Press Conference

From July 01 2016 to July 02 2016

Workshop with Rik Moran The Eight Hour Photobook

This workshop will play with the relationship between images and writing, thinking about how we can create images through language and use our photographic practice and our thinking about photography in an expanded way.

Teichmann merges the literary and visual throughout her work, juxtaposing different forms of narrative pieces which sit together as a fragmented form of storytelling. In artist books, voice over narratives in moving image installation, performance and text works, fiction is central to Esther’s relationship to the photographic. Please bring: – Pen and Paper
– An image (as a print out, cut out or photocopy – non screen image) – this can be a found image, your own image. Preferably not a recognisable or iconic photograph, but rather an image (whether figurative or abstract), that will act as a spring board for a

...

Discover more

Workshop with Rik Moran The Eight Hour Photobook

From July 01 2016 to July 02 2016

Workshop with Esther Teichmann Writing Photographs – Fragmented Narratives

This workshop will play with the relationship between images and writing, thinking about how we can create images through language and use our photographic practice and our thinking about photography in an expanded way.

Teichmann merges the literary and visual throughout her work, juxtaposing different forms of narrative pieces which sit together as a fragmented form of storytelling. In artist books, voice over narratives in moving image installation, performance and text works, fiction is central to Esther’s relationship to the photographic.

Please bring: – Pen and Paper
– An image (as a print out, cut out or photocopy – non screen image) – this can be a found image, your own image. Preferably not a recognisable or iconic photograph, but rather an image (whether figurative or abstract), that will act as a spring boar

...

Discover more

Workshop with Esther Teichmann Writing Photographs – Fragmented Narratives

From July 02 2016 to July 24 2016

Exhibitions of Esther Teichman and Rik Moran in Smithfield Square

As part of the 7th edition of PhotoIreland Festival, Flâneur By Dublin brings to the streets of Ireland’s capital the commissioned works of two great contemporary photographers. Displayed in a series of large cubes, their work disperses over a metal pathway installed in Smithfield Square. These large cubes become lightboxes at dusk, creating a unique display and extending the enjoyment of this open-air gallery throughout the night.

The two selected artists for Flâneur By Dublin are Esther Teichmann (DE) and Rik Moran (UK). They both enjoyed a residency in Ireland earlier this year, engaging with the urban and rural landscape, and producing the present body of work.

 

About Esther Teichmann
German/ American artist Esther Teichmann (b.1980) received an MA and PhD from the Royal College of Art and has exhibite

...

Discover more

Exhibitions of Esther Teichman and Rik Moran in Smithfield Square

Esther Teichmann

Seaweed has been used as food and fertilizer in Ireland for more than four thousand years. Historically gathered mainly by women, these nutrient-rich ocean plants supplemented diets of the impoverished along the coastal region, especially during the mid 19th C Great Famine.

Ellen Hutchins (1785–1815) was an Irish botanist specializing in mosses and seaweed. Her detailed botanical watercolour illustrations and meticulous specimens of dried algae are held in the archives of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, bequeathed to Dawson Turner, the premier Victorian English botanist at Kew, with whom Ellen exchanged letters for several years sharing their research and mutual obsession with seaweed.

Anna Atkins (1799 – 1871) was an English botanist, the first artist to publish a photo book and the first female photographer. Two family acquaintances, William Henry Fox Talbot and John Herschel, were developing early photographic processes and taught Anna their inventions. Thus Atkins discovered the cyanotype, camera-less sun printing, which she would use to record all the specimens of algae found in the British Isles.

As I drive and walk through southern coastal cities and villages, climbing across rocks to gather seaweed, I think of these women. I think of the ones whose names I do not know, the gleaners, wandering the coast in search of their ocean harvest, feeding their families with the sea, the outside entering their homes with its salty smell. Walking and looking, each wet strand I pick up is different from the next. I think of the botanist and artist and camera-less photographer, who would have known each plants name and properties. I walk without destination, tracing the water’s edge until the last light goes, carrying the now heavy bag of wilderness on my back, strange now removed from the water.

Rik Moran

What is it that makes us suspend belief in reality and place our faith in systems beyond our control? The same type of faith that once led people to build mighty houses of worship, more recently led others to believe in ever increasing house prices. 

The most expensive houses in Dublin sit chained up and empty, whilst housing crisis related suicides are at an all time high. Huge tech businesses head quarter themselves here, yet contribute little to the economy. It's little wonder people seek solace in religion, or substances, shopping and gambling. Unscrupulous developers continue to profit in the misfortune of the desperate, fuelling boom to bust and back again. 

Those of us lucky enough to be on the ladder, worship at the altar of property prices, entrusting our security and future in the matrices of mortgages, entrenched in the belief that equity will lead to enlightenment come the day of reckoning.

Over four days I walked from mansions to multi-stories, corporate headquarters to council estates, and the paths and streets in-between. I set out to understand how the faiths and beliefs of the city interact with their surroundings, and what return they offer to those invested in them.

Dublin

Situated in the East of Ireland and divided by the River Liffey, Dublin is famous the world over for its easy-going charm and its vivid, infectious desire for having a good time – the Irish love a bit of 'craic', as they say.

Many of the city’s buildings are as old as they are magnificent, many of them medieval. The main historical sites that are always popular with visitors – and for good reason – include St. Patrick’s Cathedral and Dublin Castle, founded in the 12th and 13th century, respectively; both are located in an area also populated with fabulous Viking archeological remains.

Regarding its literary connections, the list of famous Irish writers who have strolled through the meandering streets of Dublin is endless: James Joyce, Oscar Wilde, Samuel Beckett, Jonathan Swift, Bram Stoker… they have all found inspiration in the vitality of this ‘dirty old town’ – as the famous song in Dublin goes – and have shaped the city as much as it has shaped them.

Of the many bustling streets in the city, two of the most popular ones, Grafton Street and Henry Street, are not only the city’s principal shopping areas, but are also famed for its buskers and eccentric street performers.

The neighbourhood of Temple Bar is the city’s riverside nightlife and cultural quarter par excellence, home to many great galleries and cultural organisations, as well as traditional pubs and restaurants. Temple Bar is representative of a city that loves the arts; it is never hard in Dublin to find amazing art exhibitions, concerts, theatre – the only difficulty lies in choosing which to see first! 

During July every year, PhotoIreland Festival spreads its programmed exhibitions around over 40 locations, allowing the visitor to discover Dublin's hidden gems while they enjoy the exhibitions.

Who we are

PhotoIreland is a volunteer led organisation dedicated to stimulating a critical dialogue around Photography in Ireland, and to promoting internationally the work of artists in and from Ireland. In 2010, we launched Ireland’s first international festival of Photography & Image Culture: PhotoIreland Festival, now celebrated every year for the month of July. We celebrated Ireland’s first Book & Magazine Fair in 2011, dedicated to Photography and the photobook. The fair was the germ of The Library Project, a unique public resource library focused on the photobook opened finally to the public in 2013. Our work continues outside the festival period with a varied programme that includes events that aim to motivate the exchange of ideas and information, active networking amongst artists and Art professionals, and a better visual literacy. 

WHAT IS THE LIBRARY PROJECT?

The Library Project is PhotoIreland’s volunteer led space holding a specialised Art bookshop, a gallery, and the public resource library of photobooks that gives name to the space. 

THE BOOKSHOP

Complementing PhotoIreland’s efforts to bring to Ireland a selection of Photographic publications rarely seen otherwise, the Art bookshop has expanded over time to include essential Art texts and many items that support local publishers and artists.

THE GALLERY

Having enjoyed an effervescent program of exhibitions and events since 2013, the gallery is now focusing on offering a growing array of photographic artworks to local audiences.

THE COLLECTION

The collection was presented for the first time in July 2011 during the PhotoIreland Festival. It took a few years to find an adequate venue to offer it to the public, and it was in September 2013 when PhotoIreland was offered the current space to host The Library Project. Today, the collection can be enjoyed, for free during opening hours, as presented today in the comfortable mezzanine space, where it receives regular visits by students, researchers, amateurs, and tourists alike.

The Library Project welcomes everyone, both individuals and organisations, to contribute to and enjoy this unique public resource library. The collection is updated and catalogued online at library.photoireland.org

Contacts

Copyright © 2017 Procur.arte Todos os direitos reservados | Privacy & Cookies

Next 2.0 Above The Line